International

Trump, Kim Jong-un sign document, pledge to work together for peace

SINGAPORE — President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un pledged to work together to bring peace to the Korean Peninsula, giving every appearance of progress toward denuclearization as they concluded their historic summit on Tuesday. Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim signed a document in Singapore that the president called “pretty comprehensive.” “Working together we will get it taken care of,” Mr. Trump told reporters as the two leaders entered one of several meetings. Mr. Kim said the dialogue was the start of a working relationship between the two countries, which have been in conflict for nearly 70 years.

Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim signed a document in Singapore that the president called “pretty comprehensive.”

“Working together we will get it taken care of,” Mr. Trump told reporters as the two leaders entered one of several meetings.

Mr. Kim said the dialogue was the start of a working relationship between the two countries, which have been in conflict for nearly 70 years.

The North Korean leader said the “world will see a major change,” and he and Mr. Trump “decided to leave the past behind.”

“There will be challenges ahead, but we will work with Trump,” Mr. Kim said. “We overcame all kinds of skepticism and speculations about this summit, and I believe that this is good for the peace.”

SEE ALSO: Trump-Kim summit could provide key intelligence to Iran’s nuclear program

Mr. Trump praised the North Korean leader, saying Mr. Kim was a “very worthy, very smart negotiator” on behalf of his people as the two leaders bid each other farewell at the close of their historic summit.

Mr. Kim’s convoy left Sentosa Island on Tuesday afternoon after signing the document with Mr. Trump, who was scheduled to leave Tuesday evening.

The left-leaning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) blasted Mr. Trump for signing the agreement.

“The Reality TV-Star Trump just pulled off the photo-op of a lifetime,” ICAN Executive Director Beatrice Fihn said. “Rather than signing an unsubstantial agreement, Trump and Kim should be signing a real document based on international law, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.”

Edward King, president of the national security advocacy group Defense Priorities, said everyone should remain skeptical of Mr. Kim but not let that overshadow the process made at the summit.

“There is no doubt about America’s enduring security, which is guaranteed by our overwhelming conventional and nuclear capabilities. Our unmatched deterrent will keep us safe indefinitely from North Korea, as it does far greater powers,” he said.

Mr. King added, “I commend President Trump for seizing this opportunity for increased diplomatic engagement and remind him that the U.S. wins as long as we avoid an unnecessary war on the Korean Peninsula.”

On several occasions, Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim did not respond to reporters who shouted out questions about whether North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons.

It was unclear how much progress they had made toward a deal for the complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantling of Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons.

But at least for now, Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim appeared to have eased decades of tension and conflict between their two countries.

Mr. Trump said he “absolutely” would invite Mr. Kim to the White House. “We have developed a very special bond,” the president said.

The White House had announced that Mr. Trump would leave Singapore on Tuesday night, earlier than expected. The scheduling change followed reports that Mr. Kim had set a deadline of Tuesday afternoon for departing Singapore, and Mr. Pompeo seemed to lower expectations before the meeting by saying the U.S. side hoped the summit would “set the conditions for future successful talks.”

The president had predicted that he would know within the first minute of meeting Mr. Kim whether a successful deal is possible. Mr. Trump has said repeatedly that he is willing to walk away if he believes North Korea isn’t serious about giving up its weapons of mass destruction.

• Dave Boyer contributed to this article, which is based in part on wires reports.


Share your thoughts, add a comment!

You must be logged in in order to place a comment.

Article comments

Loading...
No comments yet, be the first to comment this article